What I Read in December 2020

I read 6 books in December, a pretty good total for a month that contained both my birthday and Christmas. I read in 3 genres, but mostly crime/ mystery and my average rating was exactly 4, a nice round number to end the year.

TEN LITTLE HERRINGS (Elsie and Ethelred #2)
By L.C. Tyler

Genre: Crime/ Detective/ Humour
My Rating:⭐⭐⭐⭐

Last seen boarding a plane which exploded mid-flight, crime writer Ethelred is discovered, to the bafflement of his dogged literary agent Elsie Thirkettle, to be alive and currently residing in the Loire Valley. Having followed Ethelred to a run-down French hotel hosting a stamp-collectors conference chaos ensues when one guest is found fatally stabbed, soon followed by the murder of a rich Russian oligarch. 

This is the second book I’ve read in the Elsie and Ethelred series, and I didn’t find it quite as enjoyable as the first. It’s still a fun romp, though, if you can get past the constant references to Elsie’s excess weight and her love of food, especially chocolate, which began to irritate me a little I must admit. The plot is instantly forgettable, but I intend to continue with the series whenever I’m in the mood for a quick, witty read.


THE FIRST FIFTEEN LIVES OF HARRY AUGUST
By Claire North

Genre: Science Fiction
My Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Some stories cannot be told in just one lifetime. Harry August is on his deathbed. Again. No matter what he does or the decisions he makes, when death comes, Harry always returns to where he began, a child with all the knowledge of a life he has already lived a dozen times before. Nothing ever changes. Until now. As Harry nears the end of his eleventh life, a little girl appears at his bedside. “I nearly missed you, Doctor August,” she says. “I need to send a message.” This is the story of what Harry does next, and what he did before, and how he tries to save a past he cannot change and a future he cannot allow. 

I absolutely loved this from start to finish. Although I was intrigued by the setup – a man who dies and then keeps getting reborn in the same place at the same time and has to live his entire life over again – I was a bit concerned that fifteen cycles of this might get a little boring. I needn’t have worried. Claire North ( a pen name of British author Catherine Webb) tells the story in a non-linear and totally engrossing fashion. The writing is excellent too, and on occasions reminded me of Dickens’ prose, although it’s far easier to read. When the Cronus Club is introduced into the mix, and we realise that Harry isn’t alone in his unusual situation, things start to become even more complex and fascinating. The whole concept of this limited kind of time travel throws up all sorts of practical and ethical dilemmas, and my brain was firing all over the place as I read. It’s not all cerebral though. There is plenty of action especially towards the end, and the ending is pretty near perfect. I felt this book could have been written especially for my enjoyment, and I intend to check out more of North / Webb’s work in 2021.


THE HUMANS
By Matt Haig

Genre: Science Fiction
My Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Our hero, Professor Andrew Martin, is dead before the book even begins. As it turns out, though, he wasn’t a very nice man–as the alien imposter who now occupies his body discovers. Sent to Earth to destroy evidence that Andrew had solved a major mathematical problem, the alien soon finds himself learning more about the professor, his family, and “the humans” than he ever expected. When he begins to fall for his own wife and son–who have no idea he’s not the real Andrew–the alien must choose between completing his mission and returning home or finding a new home right here on Earth.

This suffered a little from being read directly after The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August, mainly because the quality of the writing is nowhere near as good. However, once I got past that, I did enjoy this humorous satire about the absurdity of humanity as seen from the point of view of an alien. It’s not just humour either, there are some genuinely poignant moments, especially between the alien and Andrew Martin’s son. There is some repetition, where the same joke is repeated in a slightly different form several times, and I think the book would be better if this had been pruned, but overall it’s made me interested in reading more from Matt Haig.


THE ARTIST’S WAY
By Julia Cameron

Genre: Self-help/ Creativity
My Rating: ⭐⭐⭐

The Artist’s Way is the seminal book on the subject of creativity. An international bestseller, millions of readers have found it to be an invaluable guide to living the artist’s life. Still as vital today—or perhaps even more so—than it was when it was first published one decade ago, it is a powerfully provocative and inspiring work. 

I read this back in June when I first bought it, just a quick read-through to get a handle on this 12-week course and what it entailed. At that time, I think I gave it a tentative 4 stars. Then in September I started working through it week by week. And for the first 6 weeks or so, I found it interesting and helpful. But after that, I started to see some problems, and over time they loomed larger. In the end, I only finished the 12 weeks for the sake of completing the course. The main issue I have is how self-focused it all is. It’s like no one in the world matters except you, and as a creative person, you have some sort of licence to be selfish and put your “artist child” first in every situation. But surely the crucial thing about childhood is that at some point you learn to grow up. You hopefully remain childlike in many ways, but less childish. And it seems that a lot of the attitudes Cameron advocates are pretty childish. And if like me, you think “manifesting” what you want is a lot of nonsense, you may hate this quite a bit. Having said that, many of the early exercises did help me with insights into the nature of my own creativity, and I think the Morning Pages and Artists’ Dates are something I will continue in some form. So three stars seems fair.


MURDER ON THE MENU (The Nosey Parker Mysteries #1)
By Fiona Leitch

Genre: Crime/ Cozy Mystery
My Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Still spinning from the hustle and bustle of city life, Jodie ‘Nosey’ Parker is glad to be back in the Cornish village she calls home. Having quit the Met Police in search of something less dangerous, the change of pace means she can finally start her dream catering company and raise her daughter, Daisy, somewhere safer. But there’s nothing like having your first job back at home to be catering an ex-boyfriend’s wedding to remind you of just how small your village is. And when the bride, Cheryl, vanishes Jodie is drawn into the investigation, realising that life in the countryside might not be as quaint as she remembers…

I requested this as an ARC from Netgalley and One More Chapter because I liked the idea of the Cornish village setting and always enjoy seeing a protagonist changing careers and making a new life for herself. And as a summer cozy read it was just what I had hoped for. Jodie is an engaging amateur detective, and quite funny at times. I also liked that she’s in her forties and has a twelve-year-old daughter. The mystery is fun, with plenty of bodies piling up before the final solution, which was just twisty enough without being too complicated. And the secondary characters are all well-drawn and interesting. I’m looking forward to meeting them again, along with Jodie. A great start to a new series.


THE SENTINEL
By Lee Child and Andrew Child

Genre: Crime/ Thriller
My Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

In broad daylight Reacher spots a hapless soul walking into an ambush. “It was four against one” . . . so Reacher intervenes, with his own trademark brand of conflict resolution. The man he saves is Rusty Rutherford, an unassuming IT manager, recently fired after a cyberattack locked up the town’s data, records, information . . . and secrets. Rutherford wants to stay put, look innocent, and clear his name. Reacher is intrigued. There’s more to the story. The bad guys who jumped Rutherford are part of something serious and deadly, involving a conspiracy, a cover-up, and murder—all centered on a mousy little guy in a coffee-stained shirt who has no idea what he’s up against. Rule one: if you don’t know the trouble you’re in, keep Reacher by your side.

This was a Christmas present, and I devoured it in a single day. I had grown a bit tired of the Reacher books a few years ago, feeling the formula was wearing thin, but Lee Child’s younger brother Andrew seems to have injected some much-needed freshness into the franchise. Child (Lee) is the master of the short-sentenced, fast-paced thriller, and this just pulled me through at breakneck speed to the very satisfying ending. It is violent, and there’s not a lot of soul-searching on Reacher’s part when he kills or maims someone, but like Arnie says in the movie True Lies, they were all bad. If you can get along with this attitude, I’d recommend The Sentinel.


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