What I Read in January 2021

What a great start to the year I had, reading-wise, in January! I read 7 books, for an average of 4.2 stars. And 3 5-star reads! Admittedly, the first book I picked up just wasn’t for me, but it was all upwards from then on. And I met my monthly goals of reading from my bookshelf, my Kindle and my library, reading one Middle Grade novel, one buddy read, at least 3 genres, and a total of at least 1500 pages.


Isla and Drew Allaway appear to have the perfect life – a strong marriage, two beautiful children and their picture-perfect home, Foxglove Farm.
But, new mum Isla is struggling.  She loves her little family but with Drew working all hours on the farm, Isla’s lonely.
When she discovers that Drew has been keeping secrets from her, Isla has to face losing the home they all love.
Can the Love Heart Lane community pull together once more to help save Foxglove Farm?  And can Isla save her home…and her marriage?

FOXGLOVE FARM
By Christie Barlow
Genre: Romance
Rating: ⭐⭐

I borrowed this from my local library, mainly because I liked the cover. I wanted a light holiday read and it sounded just the ticket. I’m a fan of English village settings in both mystery and romance genres, but I didn’t get what I wanted here, for several reasons. The writing is repetitious. The same thing is said in different ways, or even sometimes in almost the exact same words, and there is far too much “telling” and not enough “showing” when it comes to characters. And the characters just weren’t engaging to me. Not objectionable as such, just not interesting. The plot, such as it is, is a mess. I was tempted to give this one star, but as I did read it right to the end, just to see how it would be resolved, two stars seems fairer. But I won’t be picking up any other books in the series.


Sunaya’s peaceful village life is turned upside down when a simple mountain mission turns into a death-defying quest for survival.
Winter treks to summer pastures, mythical Ice-People that are scarily real, avalanches, ice falls, power plays, mysterious magic and surprising friendships – it seems not everything in life is set in stone …

THE LOST STONE OF SKY CITY
By H.M. Waugh
Genre: Middle Grade Fantasy
Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

My first 5-star read of 2021! I set myself a goal of reading one Middle Grade book every month of this year, and I’m so glad I picked this one up first. Australian author H.M. Waugh has given us a main character with a distinct and engaging voice and an adventure that is by turns funny, thrilling and moving. I loved Sunaya from the beginning paragraph. Her world is fully realised, too, and the writing is terrific. I saw where this was going fairly early on (not unusual in children’s books if you’re an adult) but enjoyed the journey thoroughly, especially Sunaya’s special ability, which is beautifully evoked. In fact, I can’t think of a single negative thing to say. H.M. Waugh is currently working on a sci-fi Middle Grade novel set on a future Mars, and I can’t wait to read it.


In the third volume of The Lord of the Rings trilogy the good and evil forces join battle, and we see that the triumph of good is not absolute. The Third Age of Middle-earth ends, and the age of the dominion of Men begins.

THE RETURN OF THE KING
By J.R.R. Tolkien
Genre: Epic Fantasy
Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

What can I say? It’s a masterpiece, and I’m so glad I reread The Lord of the Rings in December and January. The cover above is not the edition I read, by the way, because I was given The Illustrated Edition for Christmas. It’s gorgeous and a pure pleasure to finish my reread in this format. I also read some of the appendices, which are brilliant too.


In 1901, the word ‘Bondmaid’ was discovered missing from the Oxford English Dictionary. This is the story of the girl who stole it.
Esme is born into a world of words. Motherless and irrepressibly curious, she spends her childhood in the ‘Scriptorium’, a garden shed in Oxford where her father and a team of dedicated lexicographers are collecting words for the very first Oxford English Dictionary. Esme’s place is beneath the sorting table, unseen and unheard. One day a slip of paper containing the word ‘bondmaid’ flutters to the floor. Esme rescues the slip and stashes it in an old wooden case that belongs to her friend, Lizzie, a young servant in the big house. Esme begins to collect other words from the Scriptorium that are misplaced, discarded or have been neglected by the dictionary men. They help her make sense of the world.
Over time, Esme realises that some words are considered more important than others, and that words and meanings relating to women’s experiences often go unrecorded. While she dedicates her life to the Oxford English Dictionary, secretly, she begins to collect words for another dictionary: The Dictionary of Lost Words.

THE DICTIONARY OF LOST WORDS
By Pip Williams
Genre: Historical Fiction/ Literary Fiction
Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐1/2

This was a hard one to rate. I loved the first half, and then lost interest for about the next quarter, to the extent that I thought I might not finish it. I’m glad I persevered, because the final quarter was just perfect.
I’ve been trying to put my finger on what I didn’t enjoy, and I think it mainly comes down to the character of Esme herself. As a child, she is completely satisfying, hiding beneath the sorting table, stealing the words away, observing everything. but as an adult I felt she was just too passive. She does some daring things, but they are always either because she is following other people, or they are done in secret. She feels things and forms opinions but never expresses them or acts on them. In some ways, she remains that little girl hiding among the feet of the workers in the Scriptorium, and that was frustrating. I kept waiting for her to take some agency, show some passion, and she never did. Every other character was more satisfying to me, and that’s not good when she’s the protagonist. This changes slightly near the end, but not enough – too little, too late.
And yet, every other aspect of this novel is so good. The other characters are wonderful, even the dislikeable ones. The women are particularly memorable. The plot is satisfying. The relationships pleased me enormously. The times are well-evoked. And the writing is undeniably excellent. What the book has to say about both the power and limitations of words, to express and drive culture and to hurt or to heal, is profound, and brought to mind echoes of The Yield by Tara June Winch, and The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. And so I do recommend this novel, just be prepared for a bit of a lull halfway through.


Newly-orphaned Anne Beddingfeld is a nice English girl looking for a bit of adventure in London. She is on the platform at Hyde Park Corner tube station when a man falls onto the live track, dying instantly. A doctor examines the man, pronounces him dead, and leaves, dropping a note on his way. Anne picks up the note, which reads “17.1 22 Kilmorden Castle”.
The next day the newspapers report that a beautiful ballet dancer has been found dead — brutally strangled. A fabulous fortune in diamonds has vanished. And now, aboard the luxury liner Kilmorden Castle, mysterious strangers pillage Anne’s cabin and try to strangle her.
Anne’s journey to unravel the mystery takes her as far afield as Africa and the tension mounts with every step… and Anne finds herself struggling to unmask a faceless killer known only as ‘The Colonel’…

THE MAN IN THE BROWN SUIT
By Agatha Christie
Genre: Crime/ Mystery/ Thriller/ Romance
Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐ (with reservations)

I want to be upfront here. The reservations mentioned above in my rating refer to the really objectionable (to a modern reader) references to race, colonialism, and the dynamics of male/female romantic relationships. They are of their time (1924), but read very badly now. I winced quite a lot listening to this. And so I can’t wholeheartedly recommend The Man in the Brown Suit.

But, if you can get past these aspects, it’s a hugely fun example of Agatha Christie’s occasional forays into the Daring Young Girl Having a Thrilling Adventure genre. It’s not a detective story by any means, so don’t expect anything like a Poirot or Marple book. It’s a whole lot of nonsense really, and yet delicious nonsense. Our heroine is fearless, imaginative and hugely energetic, and it’s enjoyable to watch her escapades. And the character of Sir Eustace Pedlar, revealed mainly through his amusing diary entries, is a triumph. It’s also worth noting that I listened to the Audiobook narrated by Emilia Fox, and she is excellent.


TWO GIRLS GO TO A PARTY, ONLY ONE RETURNS ALIVE
Toni, the surviving teenager, is found delirious, wandering the muddy fields. She has been drugged and it’s uncertain whether she’ll survive. She says she saw her friend Emily being dragged away from the party. But no one knows who Emily is. Meanwhile the drowned body of another girl has been found on an isolated beach. And how does this all relate to the shocking disappearance of a little girl nearly a decade ago, a crime which was never solved? The girl’s mother is putting immense pressure on the police to re-open the high-profile case.
DI Rowan Jackman and DS Marie Evans of the Fenland police are stretched to the limit as they try to bring the perpetrators of these shocking crimes to justice.
There is evidence of an illegal drinking club run by a shadowy group of men, who are grooming teenagers. And the team come across a sinister former hospital called Windrush which seems to house many dark secrets.

THEIR LOST DAUGHTERS (DI Jackman and DS Evans #2)
By Joy Ellis
Genre: Crime/ Mystery/ Police Procedural
Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

This is exactly what I want from a police procedural: intelligent, logically structured, with interesting detectives and a complex mystery, and with a satisfying conclusion. I listened to it on Audiobook and couldn’t wait to get back to it each time, even listening at home, which I rarely do, saving audiobooks for long car trips. From the first few minutes I knew I was hooked and in good hands with plot, pacing, characterisation and writing. The setting in the fenlands of Lincolnshire is perfectly evoked and adds greatly to the atmosphere.
I guessed some of the solution but by no means everything, and I had quite a few surprises along the way. The complexity ramps up but is never confusing.
DI Jackman and DS Evans make a perfect duo, and the dynamic of the whole investigative team was a pleasant change from the workplace friction and dysfunction that so often seems to be present in police novels.
I also highly recommend Richard Armitage’s narration. He switches tones of voice and accents flawlessly for the various characters.
I didn’t realise when I started the novel that it’s the second in a series. I will be seeking out #1 and #3 as soon as possible.


A new story set in the world of The Expanse. One day, Colonel Fred Johnson will be hailed as a hero to the system. One day, he will meet a desperate man in possession of a stolen spaceship and a deadly secret and extend a hand of friendship. But long before he became the leader of the Outer Planets Alliance, Fred Johnson had a very different name. The Butcher of Anderson Station.
This is his story.

TEH BUTCHER OF ANDERSON STATION
By James A. Corey
Genre: Science Fiction/ short story
Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

This was a buddy read. I’m joining a group on Goodreads who are reading Corey’s The Expanse series this year. They began this month with Leviathan Wakes and this short story. As I’d already read Leviathan Wakes last year, I only added the short story to my TBR this month. It’s a solid story, in Corey’s typical style, that illuminates a bit of the backstory of a character from the first novel. A good taster for the rest of the buddy read.


How was your reading this month? Any 5-star books?

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