A love letter to Australia

This is not a bookish post, but as an Australian I just had to share this beautiful article by Sandy Barker. Enjoy.

Off the Beaten Track

It is Australia Day 2020. January 26th is a contentious date, because it marks the arrival of the First Fleet―the first European settlers who arrived in Australia in 1788.

Of course, by commemorating this date, Australia ignores that in 1788 we were already populated by hundreds of nations of Indigenous Australians forming the world’s oldest civilisation.

This post isn’t about whether or not we should change the date of Australia Day, although we should. This post is a love letter to my home, my country, my Australia.

My Australia

My Australia is the person at the tram stop who sees that you’re lost and gives you directions with a smile. My Australia is the person at the party who draws the introverts into conversation, and makes sure everyone is heard. My Australia has a hearty sense of humour―often bawdy, always self-deprecating, and sometimes a defence mechanism.

My Australia has skin…

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COVER REVEAL – CHRISTMAS AUSTRALIS: A Frighteningly Festive Anthology of Spine Jingling Tales!

My first cover reveal! And this one is especially thrilling for me because I’m one of the authors!

Christmas Australis: A Frighteningly Festive Anthology of Spine-Jingling Tales brings together eight stories that reflect the Australian experience of Christmas: a summer celebration, typically spent at the beach or under the air conditioner, eating seafood and tossing down icy drinks. But even under the bright Aussie sun, darkness might be lurking…

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WWW Wednesday

Hello, my friends!

Happy Spring if you’re in the southern hemisphere like me, and Happy Autumn/Fall for you northies.

I am so busy at the moment getting my first novel ready for publication in February (yay!) and learning all about categories, keywords, mailing lists, cover designers, formatting, etc etc that I don’t have time for a long post today. So the WWW Wednesday tag seems ideal.

This tag is hosted on Taking on a World of Words It’s easy to do, just answer the three questions below!

The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?

What did you recently finish reading?

What do you think you’ll read next?

CONTINUE READING

Speculative Fiction Festival at Writing NSW

Saturday 29th June 2019, Writing NSW, Callan Park, Lilyfield

So how was Spec Fic 19?

In a word, enthralling. This was my first time at this one-day festival about all things writing, and I absolutely loved it. I was so absorbed that I didn’t even take any photos, so this post is going to be text only. But if you’d like to see some pictures, you’ll find lots if you search for the hashtag #SpecFic19 on Twitter.

The day began with early morning mist shrouding the old buildings. Very atmospheric and appropriate, especially for the horror writers. There was coffee ready on the verandah, hot and very strong. I was going to need that caffeine. I filled my keep cup and headed inside.

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Review: The Chalk Man

By C.J.Tudor

Genre: Thriller

Rating: 5 STARS

It’s been a long time since a book hooked me so quickly and so thoroughly from the first page. And I’m not sure I’ve ever given 5 stars to a straight thriller before. So there’s a recommendation for you!

The Chalk Man is the story of Eddie and his friends and is told using two timelines. In 1986 they are teenagers living in an English village, biking around together and using chalk drawings of stick figures as a kind of code for each other. Until something shocking happens. In 2016, Eddie returns to the village in response to receiving a drawing of a stick man in the mail. He soon discovers he has to figure out what really happened in the past before he can understand and survive what’s happening now.

It’s a great setup and Tudor handles it beautifully. Both timelines are fully engaging and I was on the edge of my seat more than once. The atmosphere of menace is so well done, without ever slipping over into cheap sensationalism.

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